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Biography : Syed Mustafa Siraj


Syed Mustafa Siraj [Bengali: সৈয়দ মুস্তাফা সিরাজ ; 1930 - 4 September 2012 (82 years)] was an eminent Bengali writer. In 1994, he received the Sahitya Akademi award for his novel Mythical Man (Aleek Manush), considered his most lauded work. In 2005, his short story "Ranirghater Brittanto" was made into the film Faltu by Anjan Das. He wrote around 150 novels and 300 short stories. He is the creator of the detective character Ex-Colonel Niladri Sarkar aka "Goenda Colonel", the Detective Colonel.

 

Life and works

 

Syed Mustafa Siraj was born in a village named Khoshbaspur in the district of Murshidabad in 1930. He grew up in a home with a strong literary background surrounded by books and familiarity with several languages including Arabic, Persian and Sanskrit. His mother who wrote poetry was influential. In his youth he was involved with Leftist politics and was active with the folk drama group Aalkaap for six years (1950–56) where he played the flute and was a teacher of folk dance and drama. He traveled rural West Bengal including the districts of Murshidabad, Malda, Burdwan, Birbhum and also performed in Kolkata. In those days, he used to perform whole nights and sleep during the day. These experiences would influence his later writing.

 

One day he got tired of this life and felt he had a wider life spreading around him. He turned to writing poetry and short stories. Later he came to Kolkata and entered the world of serious writings and immediately became famous for his short stories. "Inti, pisi o ghatbabu", "Bhalobasa o down train", "Hizal Biler Rakhalera" and "Taranginir Chokh" brought fame for him. He joined a Bengali daily newspaper and worked as a journalist for years. He wrote around 150 novels and 300 short stories. His short stories "Uro pakhir Chhaya", "Manusher Janma", "Ranabhumi", "Rakter Pratyasha", "Maati", "Goghna", and "Mrityur Ghora" immediately attracted Bengali readers and intellectuals.

 

His first novel is Neel Gharer Nati (1966), it is about a village performer forced into the profession by her father, it received critical acclaim. His best known novel is Mythical Man (Aleek Manush), which won the Sahitya Akademi Award (1994), the Bankim Puraskar, and has been translated into eleven Indian languages. He also won the Narasimha Das Memorial Award for his novel Amartya Premkatha (1988). His novels Nishimrigaya (1970) and Krishna Bari Fereni (1980) have been filmed in Bengali. Other notable novels include Trinabhumi, Kingbadantir nayak, and Uttar Jahnabi; Trinabhumi was translated into all major Indian languages. His short stories "Mrityur Ghora", "Rakter Pratyasha", "Goghna" and many others have been translated into different Indian languages Hindi, Urdu and Tamil.

 

He is the creator of the detective character "Goenda Colonel", the Detective Colonel. Ex-Colonel Niladri Sarkar is the hero who finds the culprit or killer. The stories are very popular earning Siraj a dedicated fan following. From children to old people, there are huge number of readers who are fond of Colonel Niladri Sarkar. A retired Colonel – Niladri Sarkar – is the eccentric sleuth in Syed Mustafa Siraj's stories, narrated by a lazy journalist, Jayanta, who accompanies him on his missions. The colonel is a butterfly collector and ornithologist, smokes pipes and has a Santa beard. He is also jovial and likes quoting Bengali proverbs & nursery rhymes.

 

Siraj did not start his career writing for children until later in life. His reputation was built on writing novels & short stories for adults. He started writing for children to respond the huge demand for that genre in Bengali.

 
Few Books of Syed Mustafa Siraj
Kishore Colonel Samagra 2
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Kishore Colonel Samagra 1
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Kishore Colonel Samagra 3
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Article and Tutorial
The 10 Habits That Keep Marriages Strong
Try these surprisingly simple practices to stay — or fall back — in love with your partner.
By Holly Corbett

1. Not trying to change each other
Maybe you wish he folded his socks, or that he would chat it up with your friends without prompting. But, his inability to notice hair in the sink may stem from the laid-back personality that drew you to him in the first place. "One of the things we see with happy couples is that they know their partner's differences, and have pretty much stopped trying to change the other person," says Darren Wilk, a certified Gottman Couples Therapist with a private practice in Vancouver, British Columbia. "Rather than trying to fight their partner's personality style, they instead focus on each other's strengths." To better understand how to tap into both of your best qualities, take this quick relationship personality quiz.

2. Framing your demands as favors
Whether you want him to unload the dishwasher more often or pay closer attention to the kids, your partner will be more likely to change his behavior if he feels like he'll get relationship brownie points. "Throw it out there like a favor. Present it like 'here is the recipe for what will make me happy,' because everyone wants to make their partner feel happy," says Wilk. "When you present your needs, present them as what you do want rather than what you don't want." Instead of saying, "I hate when you have to have everything scheduled," try saying, "I would love to have a day where we can just be spontaneous."

3. Vocalizing your appreciation
Giving your partner positive reinforcement sounds like a no-brainer, but couples often forget to do it. "Relationship expert Gottman's research found that in everyday life, happy couples have 20 positive moments — such as a shared look, compliment, or affectionate touch — to every negative moment," says Wilk. Tell him something positive three times a day, and be specific. Instead of saying, "You're a good dad," tell him why. "You're a good dad because you helped our daughter with that puzzle, which I never would have had the patience to do."

4. Focusing on the positive
"Unhappy couples are stuck in a negative state of mind," says Wilk. "You will always find what you look for. If you look for stuff that bugs you and that your partner is doing wrong, you will find it every day. If you look at what your partner is doing it right, you’ll find it everyday." It's a choice to flip your mindset, so when you find yourself getting annoyed, visualize something he does that makes your heart flutter to halt the negative thought circuit.

5. Taking trips down memory lane
"Happy couples tend to rewrite history by glossing over the bad stuff and focusing on the happy times," says Wilk. By reliving memories out loud to your partner, it actually changes your mindset, and how you view him and think about your relationship. Try this exercise whenever your feel your relationship needs a boost: Go over the highlights of when you were first dating, or rehearse the best moments of your relationship (such as the day you had an impromptu picnic in the park during your lunch hour, or that surprise anniversary date he took you on) to uncover buried memories.

6. Never siding with the enemy
"Sometimes what affair-proofs relationships is simply being there when your partner needs to vent, and having their back without trying to fix the problem," says Wilk. "People want someone to listen to them.” The key is to be supportive, and never take the side of the person he’s venting about — even if you can see where that person is coming from. For example, if he is upset that his boss took away a contract and gave it to someone else in the office, now is not the time to say, "Well, maybe you didn't put your best effort in." Right now he needs his feelings validated, and to hear you say, "That must have been really hard." Happy couples know when to bite their tongues.

7. Not getting too comfortable
Trust, security, and commitment are key elements in any relationship, but having them doesn't mean you can treat your relationship as rock-solid, and stop trying. "Relationships are a fragile ecosystem, and that's why there is a 50% divorce rate," says Wilk. "Happy couples keep dating, telling each other they look great, and doing things together."

8. Having rituals of connection
"It's not only about having a date night, but happy couples seem to do a lot of mundane things together," says Wilk. "They have little habits that they decide to do together, whether it be sitting down to pay the bills once a month or folding laundry." We say, anything to make that pile of dirty clothes feel more manageable.

9. Knowing your partner's calls for attention
Happy couples are mindful of those little moves their partners do for attention. When Gottman's team studied 120 newlyweds in his Love Lab, they discovered that couples who stayed married six years later were paying attention to these bids for connection 86% of the time, compared to only 33% of the time for those who later divorced. So look out for the little things, and respond to his need to connect. Like if you're grocery shopping and he casually mentions that he hasn't had Fruit Loops since he was a kid, throw them in the cart for him to show that you care.

10. Doing the little things
"When it comes to relationship satisfaction, you can't just ride on the big things like, 'I don’t drink, I pay the bills, I don't beat you, we went to Hawaii last year,'" says Wilk. "This stuff is not really what keeps couples happy in their daily lives." What really matters is all the small stuff that adds up, such as being there for each other when one needs to vent, or noticing when he needs a hug, or making him his favorite meal just because. "It's also giving up on the idea that you have to feel in love all the time. Marriage is about trust and commitment and knowing each other," says Wilk. "That's what love is."
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What to Do When Your Boss Is Younger Than You

By Catherine Conlan
Monster Contributing Writer

There are always going to be challenges associated with generational differences in the workplace, but some people find dealing with a younger boss to be especially difficult. If you’re older than your boss, here are some things you should keep in mind.

Show Some Respect
One of the most important things to remember when your boss is younger than you is to show respect, says Robin Throckmorton, president of Strategic HR Inc. “While he or she may be younger, they wouldn’t be in this role if someone didn’t feel they had a lot to offer the role, even if you disagree.”

While it can be easy to think, “my kids are younger than you” or “before you were even born, we…” Throckmorton says if you show respect for your boss, you’ll get it in return.

Be Flexible and Cooperative
Keeping an open mind and staying flexible about how things get done at the office are important when there’s an age difference between you and your boss, says Paul Bernard of Paul Bernard and Associates. “For example, you may be used to a lot of face-to-face meeting time, but your boss may prefer to handle a lot of his communications via text or instant messenger,” he says.

“Don't balk at this -- you'll come across as stubborn and old-fashioned. Instead, try to align yourself as best you can with your boss's management style. You might find that there are some real advantages to doing things differently.”

Bernard then recommends trying to figure out how you can complement your boss' strengths. “Your boss may be a mobile content maven but might need help navigating office politics or be able to use some historical context about your company and how things are typically done. If you can find a way to make your younger boss more successful, you'll help not only him/her but yourself as well.”

Remember Age Is Just a Number
An age difference can be a distraction, so try not to focus on it, says Kelly Hadous of Win The Room. “Don't pay attention to your boss's age! Age doesn't matter as long as your boss provides good leadership and strong guidance, and brings passion and motivation into the company and the team. Ride along with your boss; if you share the same willingness to grow the company and move the team forward, everything will just be fine, and age won't matter.

Communicate
No matter how old your boss is, it’s important to ensure you’re on the same page, and that requires clear communication. “Early on set a time to speak with your younger boss regarding expectations, style, and role clarity,” says Scott Span of Tolero Solutions. “Ask their preferred way of communication and delivery of requirements. Boomers and Millennials need to continue to dialogue, build trust, to put stereotypes to rest to maximize performance."

Focus on the Organization
You and your boss are a team, and you’re working to help build your department, division or company. “Keep focused on the vision of the company or division for which you're working, and praise alignment,” says business coach Wayne Pernell. “You get more of what you focus on and being focused on a bigger picture can interrupt the internal monologue stemming from generational differences.”

Be Sensitive
It can be hard to avoid holding forth with the wisdom you’ve accumulated over the years, but you should try. “Refrain from behaviors that drive younger generations crazy,” says Tammy Hughes, CEO of Claire Raines Associates and international speaker and consultant on generational issues. “Avoid comparing your manager to your son or daughter. Don’t act like a know-it-all. Nip cynicism and sarcasm in the bud.”
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Writing Secure PHP
Learn how to avoid some of the most common mistakes in PHP, and so make your sites more secure.


PHP is a very easy language to learn, and many people without any sort of background in programming learn it as a way to add interactivity to their web sites. Unfortunately, that often means PHP programmers, especially those newer to web development, are unaware of the potential security risks their web applications can contain. Here are a few of the more common security problems and how to avoid them.

Rule Number One: Never, Ever, Trust Your Users

It can never be said enough times, you should never, ever, ever trust your users to send you the data you expect. I have heard many people respond to that with something like "Oh, nobody malicious would be interested in my site". Leaving aside that that could not be more wrong, it is not always a malicious user who can exploit a security hole - problems can just as easily arise because of a user unintentionally doing something wrong.

So the cardinal rule of all web development, and I can't stress it enough, is: Never, Ever, Trust Your Users. Assume every single piece of data your site collects from a user contains malicious code. Always. That includes data you think you have checked with client-side validation, for example using JavaScript. If you can manage that, you'll be off to a good start. If PHP security is important to you, this single point is the most important to learn. Personally, I have a "PHP Security" sheet next to my desk with major points on, and this is in large bold text, right at the top.
Global Variables

In many languages you must explicitly create a variable in order to use it. In PHP, there is an option, "register_globals", that you can set in php.ini that allows you to use global variables, ones you do not need to explicitly create.

Consider the following code:

    if ($password == "my_password") {

    $authorized = 1;

    }

    if ($authorized == 1) {

    echo "Lots of important stuff.";

    }



To many that may look fine, and in fact this exact type of code is in use all over the web. However, if a server has "register_globals" set to on, then simply adding "?authorized=1" to the URL will give anyone free access to exactly what you do not want everyone to see. This is one of the most common PHP security problems.

Fortunately, this has a couple of possible simple solutions. The first, and perhaps the best, is to set "register_globals" to off. The second is to ensure that you only use variables that you have explicitly set yourself. In the above example, that would mean adding "$authorized = 0;" at the beginning of the script:

$authorized = 0;

if ($password == "my_password") {

    $authorized = 1;

}



if ($authorized == 1) {

    echo "Lots of important stuff.";

}

Error Messages

Errors are a very useful tool for both programmer and hacker. A developer needs them in order to fix bugs. A hacker can use them to find out all sorts of information about a site, from the directory structure of the server to database login information. If possible, it is best to turn off all error reporting in a live application. PHP can be told to do this through .htaccess or php.ini, by setting "error_reporting" to "0". If you have a development environment, you can set a different error reporting level for that.

SQL Injection

One of PHP's greatest strengths is the ease with which it can communicate with databases, most notably MySQL. Many people make extensive use of this, and a great many sites, including this one, rely on databases to function.

However, as you would expect, with that much power there are potentially huge security problems you can face. Fortunately, there are plenty of solutions. The most common security hazard faced when interacting with a database is that of SQL Injection - when a user uses a security glitch to run SQL queries on your database.

Let's use a common example. Many login systems feature a line that looks a lot like this when checking the username and password entered into a form by a user against a database of valid username and password combinations, for example to control access to an administration area:

$check = mysql_query("SELECT Username, Password, UserLevel FROM Users WHERE Username = '".$_POST['username']."' and Password = '".$_POST['password']."'");

Look familiar? It may well do. And on the face of it, the above does not look like it could do much damage. But let's say for a moment that I enter the following into the "username" input box in the form and submit it:

' OR 1=1 #

The query that is going to be executed will now look like this:

SELECT Username, Password FROM Users WHERE Username = '' OR 1=1 #' and Password = ''

The hash symbol (#) tells MySQL that everything following it is a comment and to ignore it. So it will actually only execute the SQL up to that point. As 1 always equals 1, the SQL will return all of the usernames and passwords from the database. And as the first username and password combination in most user login databases is the admin user, the person who simply entered a few symbols in a username box is now logged in as your website administrator, with the same powers they would have if they actually knew the username and password.

With a little creativity, the above can be exploited further, allowing a user to create their own login account, read credit card numbers or even wipe a database clean.

Fortunately, this type of vulnerability is easy enough to work around. By checking for apostrophes in the items we enter into the database, and removing or neutralising them, we can prevent anyone from running their own SQL code on our database. The function below would do the trick:

function make_safe($variable) {

    $variable = mysql_real_escape_string(trim($variable));

    return $variable;

}

Now, to modify our query. Instead of using _POST variables as in the query above, we now run all user data through the make_safe function, resulting in the following code:

$username = make_safe($_POST['username']);

$password = make_safe($_POST['password']);

$check = mysql_query("SELECT Username, Password, UserLevel FROM Users WHERE Username = '".$username."' and Password = '".$password."'");

Now, if a user entered the malicious data above, the query will look like the following, which is perfectly harmless. The following query will select from a database where the username is equal to "\' OR 1=1 #".

SELECT Username, Password, UserLevel FROM Users WHERE Username = '\' OR 1=1 #' and Password = ''

Now, unless you happen to have a user with a very unusual username and a blank password, your malicious attacker will not be able to do any damage at all. It is important to check all data passed to your database like this, however secure you think it is. HTTP Headers sent from the user can be faked. Their referral address can be faked. Their browsers User Agent string can be faked. Do not trust a single piece of data sent by the user, though, and you will be fine.

File Manipulation

Some sites currently running on the web today have URLs that look like this:

index.php?page=contactus.html

The "index.php" file then simply includes the "contactus.html" file, and the site appears to work. However, the user can very easily change the "contactus.html" bit to anything they like. For example, if you are using Apache's mod_auth to protect files and have saved your password in a file named ".htpasswd" (the conventional name), then if a user were to visit the following address, the script would output your username and password:

index.php?page=.htpasswd

By changing the URL, on some systems, to reference a file on another server, they could even run PHP that they have written on your site. Scared? You should be. Fortunately, again, this is reasonably easy to protect against. First, make sure you have correctly set "open_basedir" in your php.ini file, and have set "allow_url_fopen" to "off". That will prevent most of these kinds of attacks by preventing the inclusion of remote files and system files. Next, if you can, check the file requested against a list of valid files. If you limit the files that can be accessed using this script, you will save yourself a lot of aggravation later.

Using Defaults

When MySQL is installed, it uses a default username of "root" and blank password. SQL Server uses "sa" as the default user with a blank password. If someone finds the address of your database server and wants to try to log in, these are the first combinations they will try. If you have not set a different password (and ideally username as well) than the default, then you may well wake up one morning to find your database has been wiped and all your customers' credit card numbers stolen. The same applies to all software you use - if software comes with default username or password, change them.

Leaving Installation Files Online

Many PHP programs come with installation files. Many of these are self-deleting once run, and many applications will refuse to run until you delete the installation files. Many however, will not pay the blindest bit of attention if the install files are still online. If they are still online, they may still be usable, and someone may be able to use them to overwrite your entire site.

Predictability

Let us imagine for a second that your site has attracted the attention of a Bad Person. This Bad Person wants to break in to your administration area, and change all of your product descriptions to "This Product Sucks". I would hazard a guess that their first step will be to go to http://www.yoursite.com/admin/ - just in case it exists. Placing your sensitive files and folders somewhere predictable like that makes life for potential hackers that little bit easier.

With this in mind, make sure you name your sensitive files and folders so that they are tough to guess. Placing your admin area at http://www.yoursite.com/jsfh8sfsifuhsi8392/ might make it harder to just type in quickly, but it adds an extra layer of security to your site. Pick something memorable by all means if you need an address you can remember quickly, but don't pick "admin" or "administration" (or your username or password). Pick something unusual.

The same applies to usernames and passwords. If you have an admin area, do not use "admin" as the username and "password" as the password. Pick something unusual, ideally with both letters and numbers (some hackers use something called a "dictionary attack", trying every word in a dictionary as a password until they find a word that works - adding a couple of digits to the end of a password renders this type of attack useless). It is also wise to change your password fairly regularly (every month or two).

Finally, make sure that your error messages give nothing away. If your admin area gives an error message saying "Unknown Username" when a bad username is entered and "Wrong Password" when the wrong password is entered, a malicious user will know when they've managed to guess a valid username. Using a generic "Login Error" error message for both of the above means that a malicious user will have no idea if it is the username or password he has entered that is wrong.

Finally, Be Completely and Utterly Paranoid

If you assume your site will never come under attack, or face any problems of any sort, then when something eventually does go wrong, you will be in massive amounts of trouble. If, on the other hand, you assume every single visitor to your site is out to get you and you are permanently at war, you will help yourself to keep your site secure, and be prepared in case things should go wrong.

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